Solid Waste
Frequently Asked Questions


Table of Contents

  1. May I, as a homeowner, dispose of my own waste on my own property?
  2. What is the proper disposal method for such things as dirt and rock?
  3. Are municipalities still required to collect 25 cents per month per household for the state solid waste disposal fee?
  4. What is the current state disposal fee and how is that fee apportioned?
  5. If an individual delivers his own waste to the landfill, does he still have to pay the $1.50 state disposal fee?
  6. But I take my waste to a transfer station, and they still charge a state disposal fee. I thought the fee only applied for waste delivered to a landfill.
  7. Does the Solid Waste Management Division regulate hog farms?
  8. Does the Land Protection Division regulate cemeteries?
  9. Do I need a permit from the Land Protection Division to operate a salvage yard?

May I, as a homeowner, dispose of my own waste on my own property?

Yes, State law allows a person to dispose of his own household waste on his own property PROVIDED:
a. The disposal does not create a nuisance or a hazard to public health or the environment, and/or
b. The disposal does not violate a local government ordinance.

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What is the proper disposal method for such things as dirt and rock?

Uncontaminated dirt, rock, concrete, bricks, and solidified asphalt may be disposed of at locations that do not have a permit issued by the DEQ PROVIDED the material is composed of ONLY uncontaminated dirt, rock, concrete, bricks, or solidified asphalt, the landowner consents to the disposal, and the disposal does not violate any other state or local laws or regulations.

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Are municipalities still required to collect 25 cents per month per household for the state solid waste disposal fee?

Under the new disposal fee structure, as of January 1, 1996, the state solid waste disposal fee is collected by the landfill and remitted to the state based on tonnage of waste received at the landfill. As such, municipalities must pay the state disposal fee when their waste is received at a landfill. There currently is no specific requirement that municipalities collect any state disposal fee from its citizens. How a municipality chooses to pass the disposal fee back to its citizens is up to each individual municipality.

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What is the current state disposal fee and how is that fee apportioned?

The state disposal fee is currently set at $1.50 per ton of waste received at the landfill. This is a charge over and above the tipping fee charged by the landfill for use of their landfill. Depending on the amount of waste received at the landfill, the landfill may keep $0.25 to $0.50 per ton (up to a total of $40,000) for use exclusively for capital improvements at the landfill (most landfills are using this to offset the cost of installation of truck scales at the landfill). Once the landfill has collected its $40,000, the disposal fee for that site will decrease to $1.25 per ton of waste received, and the landfill will be able to keep 12.5 cents per ton of waste received for administrative costs. Because the Solid Waste program in the DEQ receives no appropriations from the Legislature, the remainder of the fee is used by the DEQ to maintain and operate the Solid Waste program.

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If an individual delivers his own waste to the landfill, does he still have to pay the $1.50 state disposal fee?

Yes, but the actual state disposal fee required to be collected by the landfill, in addition to any landfill tipping fee, would be dependent on the size of the load. If the load weighs less than 1 ton, then the state disposal fee collected would be proportionately less than $1.50.

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But I take my waste to a transfer station, and they still charge a state disposal fee. I thought the fee only applied for waste delivered to a landfill.

Landfills are required to collect and remit the state waste disposal fee from all customers who use the landfill. When a transfer station delivers its waste to a landfill, the state disposal fee is charged to the transfer station. The transfer station is probably collecting the state disposal fee it will have to pay when the waste is finally delivered to the landfill.

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Does the Solid Waste Management Division regulate hog farms?

No.
Please direct those questions relative to hog farms to D.J. Parrish, Director, Water Quality Services, Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, (405)522-5492; their fax # is 405-522-6357.

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Does the Land Protection Division regulate cemeteries?

No.
Please refer to Oklahoma Statutes Chapter 8 for regulations governing permitting and operating cemeteries.

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Do I need a permit from the Land Protection Division to operate a salvage yard?

You do not need a solid waste permit.  You may need something for storm water run-off issued by the Environmental Complaints and Local Services Division.

If they are doing auto salvage, they may need to contact the Oklahoma Department of Transportation which can provide information to prospective automotive dismantlers regarding screening and setback requirements for those locations within One Thousand feet (1000') of a highway classified as a federally funded primary highway.
They may also need to contact the Used Motor Vehicle and Parts Commission for information on licensing.  Their website is http://www.umvpc.state.ok.us.


 

Copyright 1996-2013
Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality.
All rights reserved.
Revised: October 11, 2013 .